Paperless?

IMG_0680

 

I am trying to go paperless with my lesson plans and conferring notes. I have used The Confer App for my conferring notes and it worked adequately. I wanted to find a place where I could house my conferring notes and my lesson plans. I started using an app called Noteshelf 2. I typed my lesson plans in word and imported them into the app where I could continue to edit the them and write in notes using my Apple pencil or type additional text. My Apple pencil didn’t always work the best in this app however. I am trying an app called Notability now and my Apple pencil seems to be working better. I can still import my lesson plans from word. I have also started recording my conferring sessions when I’m going into classrooms and conferring with readers. This really helps me reflect on the language I am using with my students and helps me hold them and myself more accountable.  Each conferring session lasts 5-6 minutes. While I am recording I am also typing notes. When I play back my notes, what I typed or write is highlighted as the audio plays. This is very helpful and lets me make my note taking more efficient. I am not typing as much because I can rely on the audio to help me plan for future sessions. I also plan to play back students oral reading when it becomes useful to help them notice fluency concerns or decoding attempts.

What are you using? Any suggestions? I am really liking Notability so far! This is just my 3rd day using it and am learning more  about it everyday.

Troy

Use of Technology In guided reading Part 2

Another way to use technology within a guided reading lesson is by sharing multiple sources on a topic with students. I have been incorporating short video’s that connect to the topic of the text, to enhance meaning. It does not have to be videos however. It can be short one-page pdf documents that show different graphics, charts or other information related to your topic. Any type of infographic or short video clip can work if it enhances student meaning. Make the source has a purpose that students can either talk about through turn & talks, take notes on or write about. If it is a video you can break it up into short chunks like you do a printed text.

Also remember the study I shared in the last post. Reading one page digitally does not seem to take away from comprehension but reading more than a page does.

Sunday Cummins shared a lesson plan format on her blog recently that can be used to incorporate multiple sources into a guided reading lesson. I have found it very helpful. Check it out.
Sunday: Three Phase Plan with “A Day in Space”

I think that you can include multiple sources of information with fiction texts as well as NF texts. You can find short pieces of NF texts or videos that relate to a fiction book you are reading. Pairing fiction and NF texts has been proven to be beneficial. It works really well pairing NF pieces with historical fiction and realistic fiction, but I think it can easily work with Science fiction as well.

I just got Sunday’s new book: Nurturing Informed Thinking in the mail yesterday. I think it will be a great resource for me on using different sources of information to enhance comprehension. Digital sources and other print sources. I can’t wait to dig into it!

GkWvZzKqQq+A644TBR5Rpw

 

Here is a link to a blog post where she talks about it. Heinemann blog

Let me know your thoughts!

Use of Technology in Guided Reading

I have been really trying to think of intentional and effective ways to incorporate technology into my guided reading lessons. As a reading specialist, having students for 30 minutes makes it a challenge. I think technology should be used only if it improves the task at hand. For guided reading you really have to think about your purpose.

Is reading a text digitally better for students?  

Do students get more out of a text reading it in print form?

Can students more effectively practice skills & strategies using digital texts or printed texts?

Does the grade level of  the students matter?

Is using technology as a way for students to respond to a text the best use?

Now keep in mind I am thinking in terms of use within Guided Reading groups. I recently did a survey on my newsletter asking students to share if they liked reading on a device or a printed book. The results are below.

Screen Shot 2018-03-07 at 3.02.28 PMStudents want to be reading on devices. However when conducting my survey several said they like both, depending on the type of book.  Another survey might be needed!

After my survey I saw this tweet from Ellin Keene. @EllinKeene

The study says most students learn more effectively from printed material than digital. It talks about how digital materials can be useful when quickly reading content less than a page in length. When reading material digitally kids usually only grasp the basic gist in longer texts. So for texts longer than a page our students need to be reading print. The study was done with college students. College students are more advanced readers than my students for sure and if they have trouble deeply understanding the material they read digitally then I know most of my Emergent and transitional readers definitely will. These college students overwhelming liked reading digitally better than print. They also thought they comprehended better reading digital texts than with print. This was not the case. Their comprehension suffered. One thought was people tend read digital texts more quickly than print texts. I find this to be true with myself. I find myself printing really important documents I want to read and printing things to proofread. Here is the study: http://www.businessinsider.com/students-learning-education-print-textbooks-screens-study-2017-10

I have found the SAMR model to be very effective when trying to justify use of technology in place of other materials. The SAMR model was developed by Ruben Puentedura and provides educators questions to ask to see if selecting a digital tool is more beneficial than a non-digital tool. It provides a nice framework to use to help you decide. SAMR stands for Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, and Redefinition.

Samr

This article explains it very well. Check it out: https://www.edsurge.com/news/2015-02-06-a-guide-for-bringing-the-samr-model-to-ipads

So as an elementary teacher I need to consider the purpose of the task I want a student to complete when reading on a device. I am leaning towards use of technology for responding to reading instead of the reading itself, for guided reading. The purpose of guided reading just lends itself to print texts.  Check out this Q&A from @FountasPinnell 

There are so many apps and online tools that can help readers connect ideas and share their thinking. I am using Padlet right now.

Screen Shot 2018-03-09 at 2.55.25 PM

These tools can help readers organize their thinking and see connections they may have not noticed. This is a way to get students to notice each other’s thinking, ideas, strategies, and use of processes. It allows students to not have to worry about handwriting and spelling as much. Student can focus on their thinking and responding to a text in a meaningful way. Student can easily see classmates’ response’s as well and think about them genuinely without being embarrassed for not thinking of that themselves. Of course the proper use of language and classroom talk can make this happen as well by keeping kids engaged. I think there are times where you would defiantly use digital texts more in the classroom, but for my purpose as a reading specialist I think responding to reading seems the best use. There are many strategies that could lend themselves to digital responses in Jennifer Serravallo’s book The Reading Strategies Book.  

9780325074337 

Specifically, strategies shared in Goals 12 and 13 in the book. Goal 12 is Supporting Students’ Conversations. Goal 13 is Improving Writing About Reading.

I have not read any research on using digital texts within guided reading but would be curious to see some. What I have found online mostly talks about using technology to keep the students you are not reading with busy. I am Ok with that for now, because I see too many students reading with devices, but not really thinking as they read or reading for meaning. I think students who read online tend to read too quickly without as much thought as the study above indicates. Maybe this will change and there are exceptions. We do need to provide opportunities for students to be exposed to digital texts because they will not  going away. I love technology and use it a great deal, but I want to make sure I am meeting my students needs. I do not think  guided reading is the place however for it yet.

Let me know your thoughts!